The notable legal clouds that continue to hang over Donald Trump

November 18, 2022 at 19:31

CNN —All eyes are on former President Donald Trump, who has launched another White House bid.
The Justice Department investigation continues into whether documents from the Trump White House were illegally mishandled when they were brought to Mar-a-Lago in Florida after he left office.
A federal grand jury in Washington has been empaneled and has interviewed potential witnesses to how Trump handled the documents.
Any unauthorized retention or destruction of White House documents could violate a criminal law that prohibits the removal or destruction of official government records, legal experts told CNN.
During the panel’s hearings this summer, fingers were pointed at GOP lawmakers and Trump allies who tried to help overturn the election and Trump White House officials who failed to stop the former president’s actions.
Recently, DOJ moved to compel additional testimony from former White House counsel Pat Cipollone and deputy White House counsel Patrick Philbin.
Former New York City Mayor and Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani has appeared before the grand jury, as has Georgia Gov.
Trump Organization: Criminal tax fraud trial in New YorkAn ongoing trial in New York involves Trump’s namesake business, the Trump Organization.
Democratic lawmakers are still trying to get hold of Trump’s tax records from the Internal Revenue Service.
Trump and the Justice Department said Trump was a federal employee and his statements denying Carroll’s allegations were made in response to reporters’ questions while he was at the White House.
Personal retaliation: Alexander Vindman – Trump allies victoryA federal judge recently dismissed a lawsuit from star Trump impeachment witness Alexander Vindman, who had accused Donald Trump Jr., Rudy Giuliani and former Trump White House staffers of smearing him so that he lost his federal job.
“What (Trump’s lawsuit) lacks in substance and legal support it seeks to substitute with length, hyperbole, and the settling of scores and grievances,” US District Judge Donald Middlebrooks wrote.
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